The total number of Covid-19 clusters in Ernakulam increased to over 60 on Sunday. This is a three-fold increase in a week.
There were only around 22 infection clusters in the district on January 16.
All the infection clusters have sprung up in institutions. It has been noted that 23 clusters were identified in the Kochi Corporation limit alone and the largest cluster comprising 105 cases was reported from the high court, followed by an educational institution with 90 patients in Thrikkakara. Most of the clusters were declared on or after January 15.

Kochi Corporation’s home for destitues in Palluruthy with 62 positive cases, healthcare centres, post offices, malls, and other institutions were among the institutions from where infection clusters were reported. The increase in the number of clusters indicates the level of spread of the pandemic in the community.

“Since the patients in each of the institutional clusters are from various places, the extent of the infection will be manifold. They spread the infection to their houses. Since it has reached a stage of superspreading, the number of clusters will rise further in the district,” said district medical officer V Jayasree adding Covid deaths are fewer compared to the earlier wave.
Though health authorities said Covid deaths are significantly very few, Pachalam crematorium has cremated bodies of as many as 12 Covid patients this month till Saturday. The district witnessed a total of 20 Covid deaths from January 1-16 and 10 of them were above 80 years old. It has to be noted that authorities take a minimum of four days to officially declare the deaths.

The DMO has expressed the hope that the number of Covid cases in the district will start declining from mid-February. With Covid clusters emerging in institutions, many of them have been remaining shut for days. District health authorities said they are reopened when no more positive cases are reported for three or four days. Experts said such closures of institutions have been taking a toll on the economy.

“Now, the government has imposed a curfew on Sunday. It is difficult to understand what difference it makes. The problem is that we don’t assess the cost of closure and reopening of establishments. When a machine is stopped abruptly, it needs a lot of energy to be restarted. It is easy to close an office. But to reopen and bring back the whole system running again, it will take some time. The closure of a market or an office affects the livelihood of many. We need an integrated approach, involving various sectors including health and economy,” said D Dhanuraj, chairman of Centre for Public Policy research.

CPPR Chairman Dr D Dhanuraj comments in a news article published in The Time of India on January 24, 2022. Click here to read

Chairman at Centre for Public Policy Research | + posts

Dr Dhanuraj is the Chairman of CPPR. His core areas of expertise are in international relations, urbanisation, urban transport & infrastructure, education, health, livelihood, law, and election analysis. He can be contacted by email at [email protected] or on Twitter @dhanuraj.

D Dhanuraj
D Dhanuraj
Dr Dhanuraj is the Chairman of CPPR. His core areas of expertise are in international relations, urbanisation, urban transport & infrastructure, education, health, livelihood, law, and election analysis. He can be contacted by email at [email protected] or on Twitter @dhanuraj.

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